Trade Customers click here

We are experiencing technical problems, sorry about that. We are working on them!

Known problems are:

  • Online ordering system
    • Problems have been located and improvements to the system are being made.
    • We hope to have this service operational soon and appreciate your patience.
← Back Home
← Back to the News Archive

New Spring Fiction, Memoir and Poetry from Harbour Publishing:


March 4, 2005

This spring, look forward to a new paperback edition of Anne Cameron’s perennial bestseller Dreamspeaker. This is the powerful and deeply moving story of a troubled boy caught between two worlds, who learns too late the healing strength of faith and love. It is the kind of novel that you can’t help but lend to a friend, despite knowing you’ll never get it back. Reintroduce this classic to your library, or better yet, read it for the first time.

Also available this March: Runaway at Sea. In this YA novel, set during the Vietnam War era, internationally published author Mary Razzell draws on actual incidents and her own background in nursing to create a gripping medical adventure aboard a cruise ship. In Anne McLaughlin-Scott, Razzell creates a memorable young heroine whose courage and moral compass serve her well as she navigates the shoals of family conflict, budding sexuality and looming adulthood. James Heneghan, author of Flood and The Grave, writes that Anne is “a character who reaches right out of the pages and grabs your heart.”

Don't miss I Married the Klondike, Laura Beatrice Berton’s humorous and poignant memoir of life in the “Paris of the North,” back in print this March. In 1907, Berton, a 29-year-old kindergarten teacher, left her comfortable life in Toronto, Ontario to teach in a Yukon mining town. She fell in love with the North—and with a northerner—and made Dawson City her home for the next 25 years. I Married the Klondike is her classic and enduring memoir.

Spring is the season when the power of nature is most celebrated—a fitting time to launch Ecologue—the culmination of eco-poet Ken Belford’s lifelong quest to reconcile land and language, innovation/development and earth’s geographical history, nature and humankind’s place within it. Belford extends this deep contemplation to the relationship between poem and reader, deftly shaping his lines into a pure expression of where “ritual and mystery loiter, beyond supervision and the noise of the narrative.”