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Nightwood's Ray Hsu Nominated for The Trillium Book Award


April 13, 2005

Anthropy, the debut poetry collection written by Ray Hsu and published by Nightwood Editions, is a finalist for the 18th Trillium Book Award for Poetry, one of the most prestigious book awards Ontario has to offer.

Ray Hsu grew up in Toronto. He studied at the University of Toronto, where his work was scored for performance by the Faculty of Music. His poetry has been published in Canadian and American journals, including Fence, The Fiddlehead, Exile, Echolocation and The Literary Review of Canada. He is currently completing a PhD at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Anthropy fuses the scope of classical traditions to the disturbing agility of the moderns. Hsu artfully presents the fierce rigour of the philosophical mind engaged with the survival of histories. Excavating sites of human cruelty and endurance, intimacy and experience, Hsu puts forth the language to lead us into the inferno of our time. He brings us to a place where the living, the dead, and the imaginary cross paths. Odysseus meets Fernando Pessoa; James Dean meets Walter Benjamin. All struggle with the same problem: their pasts, visceral and desperate, continue to burn with the intensity of the present. Anthropy, Ray Hsu’s first book-length collection, is a work of extraordinary range and precision.

The Trillium Book Award for Poetry is given to a first, second or third poetry collection by an emerging Ontario writer. One award is given to poetry collections written in English, and one is given to collections written in French. Publishers receive a grant to promote the finalists prior to the announcement of the winner, and the winner receives an additional $10,000, with $2,000 for their publisher. The winners of the Trillium awards will be announced at an evening event in Toronto on April 27, 2005.