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CANCELLED
ISBN 13: 978-1-55017-535-6
ISBN 10: 1-55017-535-1
Price: $24.95 CAD; $24.95 USD
Paperback
6 x 9 - 272 pp
October 2011

Red Mittens and Red Ink

The Real Story of the Vancouver Olympics

Book Description

When Sidney Crosby popped his famous overtime goal at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver and won the gold medal in men's hockey for Canada, he gave the country a wonderful gift—but he also gave a mighty reprieve to the organizers, boosters, exploiters and profiteers who had spent years trying to sell the Olympics to a sometimes skeptical British Columbia public. The unparalleled success of all the Canadian athletes temporarily silenced the critics who said the Games were too expensive, too commercial, too political, too authoritarian, etc.—but as the euphoria surrounding the golden goal subsides and the bills pile up, the questions remain: what is the real legacy of the 2010 games and was the party was worth its six-billion-dollar price tag?

Nobody is in a better position to answer that question than veteran Vancouver journalist Bob Mackin, who covered the Games from start to finish and established himself as one of the most authoritative observers. Red Mittens and Red Ink recounts the whole story of Vancouver Games, from the credit crunch that threatened the Games' economic base, to the El Nino that melted the snow, to the Latvian crooks who used stolen Visa card numbers to buy two million dollars' worth of tickets from VANOC's website, to the tragic death of a Georgian luger at the Whistler Sliding Centre on opening day, to the unexpected and un-Canadian eruption of national pride and much, much more. This well-researched and lucidly written book offers both a credible analysis of the Games in all their triumph and tragedy as well as a satisfying retrospective of one of the most exciting events in British Columbia history.